Look After Yourselves through Lock down and Keep in Touch

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Published on April 7th, 2020 | by Pete Ogburn

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Look After Yourselves through Lock down and Keep in Touch.   Lewis is busy singing in his bedroom and creating an Easter window display.   Emily and her family have a hand painted rainbow window.   MKC H asked our members how to keep well and in touch with family during the Lock down, especially [&hellip

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Look After Yourselves through Lock down and Keep in Touch.

 

Lewis is busy singing in his bedroom and creating an Easter window display.

 

Emily and her family have a hand painted rainbow window.

 

MKC H asked our members how to keep well and in touch with family during the Lock down, especially if someone has to work away. Here are some of their ideas:

 

Skype/video chats: Have regular Skype chats – even if it is just a few minutes during a mealtime.  Younger children may not interact and shouldn’t be made to chat, but having the absent person ‘at the table’ makes it more normal.  Children also like to show the absent person what they have been making/ pictures/ lego/ favourite toys. It’s good to have a mix of phone calls for proper chats & FaceTime, which offers the opportunity for more light-hearted interaction and it’s good to see each other’s faces. Also try WhatsApp as a great free way of sharing photos & movies. Share lots of pictures of little children, as they change quickly. Use FaceTime to have a ‘virtual’  celebration together.

Recorded stories: Recorded stories work well (such as the Storybook Waves/ Storybook sailors Aggie initiative – children often still listen to ones made years ago) if the absent parent cannot be around at bedtime.  Or a story read by Skype/Facetime where both parties have the same book and younger children can follow the pictures.  This works well with any age, and an absent parent could read the book on kindle?

  

Do some baking like George, Madison and Harry.

 

Keep the absent person in everyday lives: Talk about the person who is away a lot, have plenty of photos of them around the house (including a digital photo album) and make them very much part of the everyday conversation so you never suffered from stranger shock when they come home.  Talk about what they would think or do or say in a particular situation.

Cut out: Make a life size cardboard cut out – maybe!

Music Videos: A fun thing for families to do is to make short videos for the absent person –  music videos to ‘Happy’ and ‘YMCA’ are just two options.

What is the absent person up to? Children also like to see where the absent person is –  being able to picture where the person is living/sleeping when away from home.  The children really enjoyed seeing photos of where the person has been/ what they have been doing. Maybe take a lego figure with the person who is away, who appears in the photos.

The moon/ bedtime: Look at the moon at night knowing that the person is under the same moon, albeit maybe miles away – ask the moon to look after the person and keep them safe.

Postcards and letters:  Children could send letters and post cards, even if they are just short ones, or just pictures.  You can buy bulk blank postcards on Amazon.

Memory/ Prayer Jars/Boxes: Some families keep a jar of paper wishes or prayers or special memories or activities, so that they can share these with the absent person on their return.  Or put marbles into a pot for the days away, or take marbles or smarties out of a pot counting down to being together again. Keep a special box to keep anything interesting you want to share, over FaceTime or when the person returns.

Diary: Keep a diary, so you don’t forget silly little things that you would normally share and the important events and feelings. Keep a book of special moments/milestones for very young children, so that the person can look back and read when they crawled/spoke/walked/lost teeth etc.

Treats: Make home as cosy and comforting as possible and treat yourself and, if possible, the other person one by sending or giving them some treats.

Welcome Home plans and special moments: make Welcome Home banners  extend the same banner with more prints each time) with the children’s hand and foot prints on it, for each absence. It is a really positive look forward to the end of the separation, whenever it may be.

Photo Books: Make photo books of some of the things you do while the person is away, so that they don’t miss out on your experiences/memories

Plan: Plan activities, such as family time activities, that you will do when the person is home again.

Keep Calm and Carry On: Carry on with your usual routine and keep busy, don’t wait around for when your loved one comes home again.


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